The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

PALS welcomes a post from Matthew Teutsch, who is director of the Lillian E. Smith Center at Piedmont College. In this post, Teutsch writes about language in Huck Finn and investigates moments where it, for examples, includes or excludes some characters from recognizing other character's humanity. While I was in Norway, I taught Mark Twain's … Continue reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

Is this the End of PALS? – Revisiting a Reflection

An Edit: I want to engage in an experiment. Below you'll find the skeleton of a post that first appeared in November 2019. Originally, I modeled the post after click-bait YouTube videos. I dashed the post off quickly. The posts central argument remains lodged in my thoughts, even though I made quick work of writing … Continue reading Is this the End of PALS? – Revisiting a Reflection

PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Pandemic Distance High School

Dear College Professor, I’m Teaching High School during the Covid-19 pandemic. IMG_0429 via Xavier R. Chen At some point during your own cycle of on-again-off-again, in-person, mask-mandatory, mask-optional, socially distanced, hybrid, remote, online teaching this fall, you might think “gosh, I wonder how they’re doing it in high school right now? What’s this going to … Continue reading Pandemic Distance High School

Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Editor's Note: PALS is excited to share this guest post on teaching with Discord from Mark Bresnan. In this post, Mark walks us through the ins and outs of getting started with Discord, while also addressing both the benefits and potential concerns with the popular online service. Last spring, when my institution announced they were … Continue reading Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Why Moby-Dick?

Why Meme Moby-Dick? You don’t have to be a long-time follower of PALS to know that we post a lot of Moby-Dick content on our Twitter account. And the PALS site, too. Really, though, saying we post a lot of Moby-Dick content doesn’t explain the entirety of our fixation. In general, we post a lot … Continue reading Why Moby-Dick?

Black Lives Matter: Be an Ally in the Classroom

Statement of Support Black Lives Matter.  PALS celebrates the lives of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among so many others whose lives were tragically taken due to racism in the US. We mourn with the people who knew and loved them.  We condemn the police officers who murdered Taylor and Floyd. We acknowledge that their … Continue reading Black Lives Matter: Be an Ally in the Classroom

What’s in a survey?

This spring I had a rare chance to teach a literature survey course that is required for our English majors and minors. I taught a similar course as a doctoral student at the University of Missouri nearly a decade ago, which has remained my favorite course for all of those years. Both then and now, … Continue reading What’s in a survey?

Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part II: Longfellow and Eliot

This post is the second by Jessica Kirzane about teaching Yiddish translations of American literature in American literature classes. Kirzane is an Assistant Instructional Professor in Yiddish at the University of Chicago. You can find part one here. In the last post, I shared with the PALS community some general thoughts about teaching American literature through … Continue reading Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part II: Longfellow and Eliot

Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part I: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

PALS is excited to welcome a post by Jessica Kirzane. Kirzane is an Assistant Instructional Professor in Yiddish at the University of Chicago. This is the first of two posts discussing how to incorporate Yiddish translations of American literature into the American literature classroom. You can find part two of the series here. I think … Continue reading Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part I: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Avast, me hearties, and an ahoy to those of you whose distance-teaching semesters are winding down. Why are you reading this? Please go feed your sourdough starter instead. (And then, please help me to understand how to feed mine. That burping thing it’s doing right now—is that good? Bad? Oh why did I accept this … Continue reading Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!