Teaching the Literature of Witchcraft

Teaching the literature of the Salem Witch Trials has gone out of fashion in the early years of the twenty-first century. It had probably gone out of fashion already by the time I was in high school in the 1980s because most of what I learned about the Salem Witch Trials came from reading Arther … Continue reading Teaching the Literature of Witchcraft

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Planning Native American Literature in the Beginnings to 1865 Survey of American Literature

I have always had issues with the canon and the periodization of literature. This in turn makes the struggle of what to include in the Early American literature survey course even more complicated. What does “Beginnings” actually mean? Sometimes the phrasing is “From First Contact” which I also wonder about. Depending on the anthology one … Continue reading Planning Native American Literature in the Beginnings to 1865 Survey of American Literature

Misattribution and Repurposing the Captivity Trope: Teaching Louise Erdrich and Sherman Alexie with Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God

PALS Note: We are excited to have a guest post from Randi Tanglen on complicating the discussion of Mary Rowlandson's captivity narrative through the work of two contemporary Native American poets. Tanglen is an Associate Professor of English and director of the faculty development and teaching center at Austin College.  Update: PALS is pleased to … Continue reading Misattribution and Repurposing the Captivity Trope: Teaching Louise Erdrich and Sherman Alexie with Mary Rowlandson’s The Sovereignty and Goodness of God

Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature – Part One: Oral Cultures

Given the present clashes at Standing Rock and the irony of those voices telling Native Americans to “go home,” I’d venture to say the time is ripe for teachers of American literature to revisit the ways in which our classes construct—both explicitly and implicitly—Americanness. I’m interested in how we begin the survey course, odd beast … Continue reading Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature – Part One: Oral Cultures

Addressing Despair in the Classroom: An Ecocritical Approach to Non-Canonical American Writers

PALS Note: This is the second post from Christina Katopodis about her novel approaches to the American literature survey. Read below for her ideas on combatting despair in face of the many injustices and tragedies in American literary history. And find her first post here.  In my last post, I talked about building community in … Continue reading Addressing Despair in the Classroom: An Ecocritical Approach to Non-Canonical American Writers

Anthology Spotlight: Dawnland Voices

This week we are spotlighting Dawnland Voices: An Anthology of Indigenous Voices edited by Siobhan Senier and published by the University of Nebraska Press. At nearly 700 pages, Dawnland Voices is a substantial contribution to the availability of writings by Native Americans for the classroom. Our profile of Dawnland Voices is not comprehensive—it is hard … Continue reading Anthology Spotlight: Dawnland Voices