Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

PALS is excited to welcome back Kristin Lacey for another guest post. Lacey is a PhD student at Boston University working on nineteenth-century American literature. In her post, Lacey documents changes she made for online teaching to help foster student interactions and community building. She explores how these online practices could be adapted for the … Continue reading Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Editor's Note: PALS is excited to share this guest post on teaching with Discord from Mark Bresnan. In this post, Mark walks us through the ins and outs of getting started with Discord, while also addressing both the benefits and potential concerns with the popular online service. Last spring, when my institution announced they were … Continue reading Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Community as Classroom

PALS warmly welcomes a guest post from Rachel Cohen. Cohen is a high school humanities teacher in Vermont. She is currently working on a fellowship project funded through the Rowland Foundation. In the post below, she details some of what she has learned (and implemented) so far this year about place-based learning. This year, through … Continue reading Community as Classroom

On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

PALS is once again excited to announce a guest post — this time by Sonya Lawson-Salmasi, a lecturer at Ohio State University. Lawson-Salmasi writes about using Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in the composition classroom. Find out more about Lawson-Salmasi's teaching here. Dr. Yvette DeChavez’s call to decolonize our literature syllabi is particularly relevant in 2019. As … Continue reading On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

The Agentive Classroom

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post by Kristin Lacey. Lacey is a PhD student at Boston University working on nineteenth-century American literature. In her post, Lacey explores how she and her students form their classroom community and how they build agency into the semester's activities. menard_mickael With each semester I’ve taught, I’ve asked … Continue reading The Agentive Classroom

Reflections on Teaching Moby-Dick Through Collaborative Digital Annotation

PALS warmly welcomes Nadhia Grewal to the site for a guest post on Moby-Dick. Grewal explains how she helped her students tackle reading the book through a digital annotation activity. Find other PALS Moby-Dick content here, here, and here. In 'Inventing the Nation: Mid-Nineteenth Century American Literature', an undergraduate class in the English and Comparative … Continue reading Reflections on Teaching Moby-Dick Through Collaborative Digital Annotation

“Not to Drill, but to Create”: The Value of Service-Learning in a Transcendentalism-Themed Composition Course

PALS is very excited to have a guest post by LuElla D'Amico who teaches at the University of Incarnate Word in Texas. In this post, D'Amico explains the set up of her composition course which uses transcendentalism as a way to support students' formation of a scholarly community. This community building and academic learning is … Continue reading “Not to Drill, but to Create”: The Value of Service-Learning in a Transcendentalism-Themed Composition Course

Strategies for Teaching Blocked Writers

PALS Note: We are happy to have Aaron Colton take us through his composition course that focuses on the ever pervasive writer's block. Both Colton and his students made unexpected discoveries along the way. Join us as we get a glimpse into that journey. On the first day of the fall 2018 semester at Georgia … Continue reading Strategies for Teaching Blocked Writers

Mapping Don DeLillo’s White Noise

PALS is very happy to welcome Katie Fitzpatrick back to the blog. Her first post can be found here. Fitzpatrick currently works at the Coordinated Arts Program in the University of British Columbia. The following post describes a mapping classroom activity where students reacted to passages from Don DeLillo's White Noise. After reading the first … Continue reading Mapping Don DeLillo’s White Noise

The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

PALS is pleased to have a returning guest post from Matthew Teutsch, who is currently a Fulbright Scholar at the University of Bergen in Norway. Teutsch's first post for PALS can be found here and his own academic blog here. In this post, Teutsch explores The Great Gatsby and race from the perspective of what a "Nordic" … Continue reading The Master Race? Xenophobia and Racism in F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby

PALS Summer Post Roundup

Site visits and page views are lean for PALS between the May and Labor Day. A summer readership drop-off is a common occurrence for many academic blogs, perhaps especially so for a blog focusing exclusively on teaching. Our traffic successes follow the rhythms of the academic school year. (You can read more about our traffic … Continue reading PALS Summer Post Roundup