Teaching Books You Love

One curious thing about teaching literature (I don't know if it happens the same in other fields) is that students want to like or even love the things that you teach them. That sounds awesome! But actually I think liking can get in the way of the purposes for which we use texts in the … Continue reading Teaching Books You Love

Work in Life in the Iron Mills, “A Church Mouse,” and “Bartleby, the Scrivener”

What do Life in the Iron Mills, "A Church Mouse," and "Bartleby, the Scrivener" have in common? My first instinct would probably be to answer: not much. Yet, I teach all of these three texts together in a sequence that is focused on work, and while all very different, they fit together well to ask … Continue reading Work in Life in the Iron Mills, “A Church Mouse,” and “Bartleby, the Scrivener”

Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post from Carie Schneider. Schneider is assistant professor and Director of Composition in the Department of Communication, English and Foreign Languages at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. In the post below, she outlines some tips for using the Google Suite in a hybrid survey course. As many of us … Continue reading Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

PALS welcomes a post from Matthew Teutsch, who is director of the Lillian E. Smith Center at Piedmont College. In this post, Teutsch writes about language in Huck Finn and investigates moments where it, for examples, includes or excludes some characters from recognizing other character's humanity. While I was in Norway, I taught Mark Twain's … Continue reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language