Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

PALS is excited to welcome back Kristin Lacey for another guest post. Lacey is a PhD student at Boston University working on nineteenth-century American literature. In her post, Lacey documents changes she made for online teaching to help foster student interactions and community building. She explores how these online practices could be adapted for the … Continue reading Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post from Carie Schneider. Schneider is assistant professor and Director of Composition in the Department of Communication, English and Foreign Languages at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. In the post below, she outlines some tips for using the Google Suite in a hybrid survey course. As many of us … Continue reading Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

In These Uncertain Times: Embracing the Weird in a Contemporary Literature Seminar

PALS welcomes a guest post from Kate Harlin. Harlin is an Assistant Professor of Postcolonial Literature at Eureka College in Eureka, Illinois. In this post, she writes about the joys and challenges of planning and executing a contemporary literature seminar in her first job during a pandemic. This was going to be a weird semester no … Continue reading In These Uncertain Times: Embracing the Weird in a Contemporary Literature Seminar

PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

While many of us have taught online before, we have not done so in the circumstances of a pandemic. Also, most of us have not been faced with a situation where the planning for our classes is so up in the air and where we have to switch between face to face plans and digital … Continue reading PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

PALS welcomes a post from Matthew Teutsch, who is director of the Lillian E. Smith Center at Piedmont College. In this post, Teutsch writes about language in Huck Finn and investigates moments where it, for examples, includes or excludes some characters from recognizing other character's humanity. While I was in Norway, I taught Mark Twain's … Continue reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Editor's Note: PALS is excited to share this guest post on teaching with Discord from Mark Bresnan. In this post, Mark walks us through the ins and outs of getting started with Discord, while also addressing both the benefits and potential concerns with the popular online service. Last spring, when my institution announced they were … Continue reading Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Black Lives Matter: Be an Ally in the Classroom

Statement of Support Black Lives Matter.  PALS celebrates the lives of George Floyd and Breonna Taylor, among so many others whose lives were tragically taken due to racism in the US. We mourn with the people who knew and loved them.  We condemn the police officers who murdered Taylor and Floyd. We acknowledge that their … Continue reading Black Lives Matter: Be an Ally in the Classroom

Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part II: Longfellow and Eliot

This post is the second by Jessica Kirzane about teaching Yiddish translations of American literature in American literature classes. Kirzane is an Assistant Instructional Professor in Yiddish at the University of Chicago. You can find part one here. In the last post, I shared with the PALS community some general thoughts about teaching American literature through … Continue reading Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part II: Longfellow and Eliot

Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part I: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

PALS is excited to welcome a post by Jessica Kirzane. Kirzane is an Assistant Instructional Professor in Yiddish at the University of Chicago. This is the first of two posts discussing how to incorporate Yiddish translations of American literature into the American literature classroom. You can find part two of the series here. I think … Continue reading Yiddish Translations of American Literature in Your American Literature Class, Part I: Uncle Tom’s Cabin

At Home with PALS: What We are Doing while Social Distancing

We hope you are all hanging in there! As we also try to hang in there during this covid-19 crisis, we thought we would break a bit from our regularly scheduled content and provide some insight into how our PALS writers are spending their days during social distancing. We provide the suggestions in the hope … Continue reading At Home with PALS: What We are Doing while Social Distancing

Tips for Faculty Teaching African American Languages and Literature

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post by Carly Overfelt. Overfelt writes about the mistakes that white people can make when teaching African American languages and literature and provides information about how to do this better in the classroom. Several weeks ago, a news story circulated on Twitter about a high school student who … Continue reading Tips for Faculty Teaching African American Languages and Literature