Book Spotlight: Creating Captivating Classes: A Guide for Kink, Sexuality, and Relationship Presenters

The Why I purchased Creating Captivating Classes: A Guide for Kink, Sexuality, and Relationship Presenters by Shay and Stefanos Tiziano for several reasons. First, the table of contents suggested a huge range of teaching topics covered throughout the book. The depth and breadth of topics captured my attention because many introductory teaching books I see … Continue reading Book Spotlight: Creating Captivating Classes: A Guide for Kink, Sexuality, and Relationship Presenters

Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

PALS is excited to welcome back Kristin Lacey for another guest post. Lacey is a PhD student at Boston University working on nineteenth-century American literature. In her post, Lacey documents changes she made for online teaching to help foster student interactions and community building. She explores how these online practices could be adapted for the … Continue reading Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post from Carie Schneider. Schneider is assistant professor and Director of Composition in the Department of Communication, English and Foreign Languages at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. In the post below, she outlines some tips for using the Google Suite in a hybrid survey course. As many of us … Continue reading Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

In These Uncertain Times: Embracing the Weird in a Contemporary Literature Seminar

PALS welcomes a guest post from Kate Harlin. Harlin is an Assistant Professor of Postcolonial Literature at Eureka College in Eureka, Illinois. In this post, she writes about the joys and challenges of planning and executing a contemporary literature seminar in her first job during a pandemic. This was going to be a weird semester no … Continue reading In These Uncertain Times: Embracing the Weird in a Contemporary Literature Seminar

PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

While many of us have taught online before, we have not done so in the circumstances of a pandemic. Also, most of us have not been faced with a situation where the planning for our classes is so up in the air and where we have to switch between face to face plans and digital … Continue reading PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Editor's Note: PALS is excited to share this guest post on teaching with Discord from Mark Bresnan. In this post, Mark walks us through the ins and outs of getting started with Discord, while also addressing both the benefits and potential concerns with the popular online service. Last spring, when my institution announced they were … Continue reading Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Tips for Faculty Teaching African American Languages and Literature

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post by Carly Overfelt. Overfelt writes about the mistakes that white people can make when teaching African American languages and literature and provides information about how to do this better in the classroom. Several weeks ago, a news story circulated on Twitter about a high school student who … Continue reading Tips for Faculty Teaching African American Languages and Literature

Teaching Whitman with Whitman, Alabama

PALS is pleased to have another guest post by Matthew Luter. See Luter's first post here. In this post he explores teaching Walt Whitman with Whitman, Alabama and explains the digital project that he has designed to go along with the reading. I teach a yearlong American literature survey regularly. And I tend to use … Continue reading Teaching Whitman with Whitman, Alabama

PALS Book Club: Intentional Tech, Intro-Chapter 3

Here at PALS we are on a bit of a kick with the Teaching and Learning in Higher Education series from WVU Press. Caitlin Kelly recently wrote about Geeky Pedagogy, and I have been reading Intentional Tech by Derek Bruff. As, I mentioned in the first post, I want to turn my reading of the … Continue reading PALS Book Club: Intentional Tech, Intro-Chapter 3

Cookbooks Not Novels

I have kept a running list of things students have called novels: plays, essays, articles, both primary and secondary sources of all sorts, poems, textbooks, memoirs, and cookbooks. Given how often I teach cookbooks in the scope of the American Literary tradition I have perhaps encountered this term-swapping with “cookbooks” at a disproportionate rate. Before … Continue reading Cookbooks Not Novels

The Sound of Silence

I used to joke that I never liked my students as much as when they were taking a test. Heads done, writing with purpose, thinking hard: they just looked so studious. I have recently realized that there is more truth in that joke than I might have first thought. And the truth isn't necessarily about … Continue reading The Sound of Silence