Teaching Books You Love

One curious thing about teaching literature (I don't know if it happens the same in other fields) is that students want to like or even love the things that you teach them. That sounds awesome! But actually I think liking can get in the way of the purposes for which we use texts in the … Continue reading Teaching Books You Love

Work in Life in the Iron Mills, “A Church Mouse,” and “Bartleby, the Scrivener”

What do Life in the Iron Mills, "A Church Mouse," and "Bartleby, the Scrivener" have in common? My first instinct would probably be to answer: not much. Yet, I teach all of these three texts together in a sequence that is focused on work, and while all very different, they fit together well to ask … Continue reading Work in Life in the Iron Mills, “A Church Mouse,” and “Bartleby, the Scrivener”

The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

PALS welcomes a post from Matthew Teutsch, who is director of the Lillian E. Smith Center at Piedmont College. In this post, Teutsch writes about language in Huck Finn and investigates moments where it, for examples, includes or excludes some characters from recognizing other character's humanity. While I was in Norway, I taught Mark Twain's … Continue reading The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn and Language

PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Why Moby-Dick?

Why Meme Moby-Dick? You don’t have to be a long-time follower of PALS to know that we post a lot of Moby-Dick content on our Twitter account. And the PALS site, too. Really, though, saying we post a lot of Moby-Dick content doesn’t explain the entirety of our fixation. In general, we post a lot … Continue reading Why Moby-Dick?

Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Avast, me hearties, and an ahoy to those of you whose distance-teaching semesters are winding down. Why are you reading this? Please go feed your sourdough starter instead. (And then, please help me to understand how to feed mine. That burping thing it’s doing right now—is that good? Bad? Oh why did I accept this … Continue reading Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Teaching Whitman with Whitman, Alabama

PALS is pleased to have another guest post by Matthew Luter. See Luter's first post here. In this post he explores teaching Walt Whitman with Whitman, Alabama and explains the digital project that he has designed to go along with the reading. I teach a yearlong American literature survey regularly. And I tend to use … Continue reading Teaching Whitman with Whitman, Alabama

The Single Author Course: A Harriet Beecher Stowe Case Study

Background A few weeks ago, the PALS Twitter page, which you should all be following, had a brief flurry of discussion regarding the single author course. The discussion was kicked off by a retweet and the subsequent responses provided many fruitful exchanges. We also posted a follow up question inquiring about the single author courses … Continue reading The Single Author Course: A Harriet Beecher Stowe Case Study

Hawthorne’s Haunted House

Every fall, I try to teach a “spooky” work to capitalize on the Halloween spirit floating around campus. This semester, I selected Nathaniel Hawthorne’s 1851 novel The House of the Seven Gables. As part of the American gothic tradition, The House of the Seven Gables has all the right ingredients: a cursed family, unexplained deaths, … Continue reading Hawthorne’s Haunted House

On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

PALS is once again excited to announce a guest post — this time by Sonya Lawson-Salmasi, a lecturer at Ohio State University. Lawson-Salmasi writes about using Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in the composition classroom. Find out more about Lawson-Salmasi's teaching here. Dr. Yvette DeChavez’s call to decolonize our literature syllabi is particularly relevant in 2019. As … Continue reading On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

Reflections on Teaching Moby-Dick Through Collaborative Digital Annotation

PALS warmly welcomes Nadhia Grewal to the site for a guest post on Moby-Dick. Grewal explains how she helped her students tackle reading the book through a digital annotation activity. Find other PALS Moby-Dick content here, here, and here. In 'Inventing the Nation: Mid-Nineteenth Century American Literature', an undergraduate class in the English and Comparative … Continue reading Reflections on Teaching Moby-Dick Through Collaborative Digital Annotation