On not teaching in a pandemic…

A new essay last went up on our site April 1, 2021. It does not escape us that the post went up on April Fools Day.  Not that it means anything.  I encourage you to read the post, one of the most popular of the year. Kristin Lacey covers how we might adapt community building … Continue reading On not teaching in a pandemic…

Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

PALS is excited to welcome back Kristin Lacey for another guest post. Lacey is a PhD student at Boston University working on nineteenth-century American literature. In her post, Lacey documents changes she made for online teaching to help foster student interactions and community building. She explores how these online practices could be adapted for the … Continue reading Zooming Out: What Teaching Online Taught Me About Classroom Community

Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

PALS is excited to welcome a guest post from Carie Schneider. Schneider is assistant professor and Director of Composition in the Department of Communication, English and Foreign Languages at Cameron University in Lawton, Oklahoma. In the post below, she outlines some tips for using the Google Suite in a hybrid survey course. As many of us … Continue reading Working Together While Being Apart: Effective Pedagogical Experiments in a Hybrid Literature Survey Course

PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

While many of us have taught online before, we have not done so in the circumstances of a pandemic. Also, most of us have not been faced with a situation where the planning for our classes is so up in the air and where we have to switch between face to face plans and digital … Continue reading PALS Roundtable: Digital Teaching Strategies in a Pandemic

PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Editor's Note: PALS is excited to share this guest post on teaching with Discord from Mark Bresnan. In this post, Mark walks us through the ins and outs of getting started with Discord, while also addressing both the benefits and potential concerns with the popular online service. Last spring, when my institution announced they were … Continue reading Teaching with Discord: A beginner’s guide (written by a beginner)

Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Avast, me hearties, and an ahoy to those of you whose distance-teaching semesters are winding down. Why are you reading this? Please go feed your sourdough starter instead. (And then, please help me to understand how to feed mine. That burping thing it’s doing right now—is that good? Bad? Oh why did I accept this … Continue reading Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

How Did Kurt Vonnegut Know There Would Be a Pandemic?

When we plan courses, our choices are deliberate, right? We conscientiously select texts and arrange them in meaningful ways to increase the odds of student engagement, and we envision particular learning outcomes based on the trajectories we spend months setting up. Yet, despite all the planning and preparation, sometimes the most profound moments of learning … Continue reading How Did Kurt Vonnegut Know There Would Be a Pandemic?

Self-Care; and A Compilation of Online Teaching Support Resources for COVID-19

A few years back, I wrote a self-care post: “Physical, Mental, and Emotional Taxation in the Classroom.” It was responding to the standard wear and tear involved in the field of teaching. Now, with the current COVID-19 stress of remote teaching, many are feeling an additional strain of trying to teach through entirely different platforms … Continue reading Self-Care; and A Compilation of Online Teaching Support Resources for COVID-19