PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

During the Before Times, academic summer, running roughly between the start of May and the week after Labor Day, represented a sparse time for PALS site viewership. Yes, we do share new pieces during the summer, but the posts don't always receive the same viewership as posts published outside of academic summer. One great thing … Continue reading PALS Summer 2020 Post Retrospective

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Cookbooks Not Novels

I have kept a running list of things students have called novels: plays, essays, articles, both primary and secondary sources of all sorts, poems, textbooks, memoirs, and cookbooks. Given how often I teach cookbooks in the scope of the American Literary tradition I have perhaps encountered this term-swapping with “cookbooks” at a disproportionate rate. Before … Continue reading Cookbooks Not Novels

On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

PALS is once again excited to announce a guest post — this time by Sonya Lawson-Salmasi, a lecturer at Ohio State University. Lawson-Salmasi writes about using Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in the composition classroom. Find out more about Lawson-Salmasi's teaching here. Dr. Yvette DeChavez’s call to decolonize our literature syllabi is particularly relevant in 2019. As … Continue reading On Writing and Ojibwe: Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft in Writing Classes

Comminglings of Law and Literature: Thoughts from the Yukon Territory

I am presently on a Fulbright in Whitehorse, Yukon (northwestern Canada) to write essays. Politics-wise, this year gives me a little window through which to watch Indigenous land claims unfold in the Yukon, and pedagogy-wise it gives me time to observe the special relationship that Yukon College (the future Yukon University) maintains with the territory’s … Continue reading Comminglings of Law and Literature: Thoughts from the Yukon Territory

Teaching Japanese Internment Using Julie Otsuka’s When The Emperor Was Divine

PALS is happy to have a guest post from Jessica Thelen, who is an incoming PhD student in English at the University of Delaware. Thelen writes about teaching Japanese Internment in her Introduction to American literature classses and, in addition to providing useful teaching ideas, Thelen makes astute observations about what subjects are and are … Continue reading Teaching Japanese Internment Using Julie Otsuka’s When The Emperor Was Divine

Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft

This fall, I’m teaching an upper-level literature course on nineteenth century American women writers. It’s a big class, full of mostly English and Gender Studies majors and minors. This is the second time I’ve taught this course, but the first time I’ve included Ojibwe poet Jane Johnston Schoolcraft. (Note: in the 19th century, the Ojibwe … Continue reading Teaching Jane Johnston Schoolcraft

Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature-Part Two: Contemporary Texts and Authors

In November, I blogged about teaching ancient oral literatures at the beginning of a semester-long survey course in American literature. Here’s the follow-up on coming full circle from oral tradition (in weeks one and two) to contemporary Native American literature (in weeks fourteen and fifteen). Bookending a survey course with studies of Native literature is … Continue reading Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature-Part Two: Contemporary Texts and Authors

Teaching Junot Diaz’s Drown through the Lens of Critical Patriotism

PALS Note: This post is part two of a post on teaching Junot Diaz. Part one is here. This post gets into more specifics on how to use the critical patriotism framework offered by Ben Railton's book. Also, please check out the post that started this all: Shelli Homer's look at Railton's ideas about Charles … Continue reading Teaching Junot Diaz’s Drown through the Lens of Critical Patriotism

Being an “American Original”: Frameworks for Teaching Texts by Junot Diaz

PALS Note: The following is part of our 3 post series that uses Ben Railton's book, History and Hope in American Literature: Models of Critical Patriotism, as a lens to discuss pedagogy. Check out part one of our series by Shelli Homer and part three by Brianne Jaquette. In this post, I will cover how some of the frames … Continue reading Being an “American Original”: Frameworks for Teaching Texts by Junot Diaz

Sequencing Stories with Katherine Anne Porter and Sui Sin Far

In the spring at PALS, I wrote about teaching three stories from the perspective of all of them being a little weird, and this fall, in my revised teaching statement, I wrote about how important it is to sequence students’ work—how one assignment needs to lead into the next and build to the end of … Continue reading Sequencing Stories with Katherine Anne Porter and Sui Sin Far