Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Avast, me hearties, and an ahoy to those of you whose distance-teaching semesters are winding down. Why are you reading this? Please go feed your sourdough starter instead. (And then, please help me to understand how to feed mine. That burping thing it’s doing right now—is that good? Bad? Oh why did I accept this … Continue reading Arrrrrrr! It’s time to Treasure Hunt with Dickinson!

Becoming an Archival Expert

When I teach nineteenth century American literature, I always want students to delve into the archives, and so I demonstrate a few digital searches in class and make it a requirement to include at least one archival source in the final research paper. But I wanted more investment, and not just for their papers. I … Continue reading Becoming an Archival Expert

Digital Literacy and Women in Knowledge-Building Systems: #MOWomenOnWikipedia

PALS Note: We welcome this contribution from Megan Peiser on using Wikipedia in the composition classroom. Peiser holds a doctorate from the University of Missouri and is the creator of the Novels Reviewed Database, 1790-1820. Find more information about Megan here.  Class: Digital Literacy and Women in Knowledge-Building Systems: #MOWomenOnWikipedia Level: Intermediate Composition Class Demographics: … Continue reading Digital Literacy and Women in Knowledge-Building Systems: #MOWomenOnWikipedia

Early American Library History and Digital Humanities Using Hamilton

PALS Note: This week PALS is pleased to present a series of posts with reflections on teaching approaches for Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamilton: An American Musical in various classroom contexts. We hope that these posts are a fruitful spark for continued discussion on ideas for teaching Hamilton in the classroom. (Here are the links to the other … Continue reading Early American Library History and Digital Humanities Using Hamilton

Using Digital Archives to Teach Nineteenth-Century African American Writers

This fall, I’m teaching an upper-level English course on nineteenth-century African American writers. When I was planning the course, I knew I wanted to give students, most of whom are seniors majoring in English, History, or Ethnic Studies, practice working with the growing body of digital archives on nineteenth-century black writers. Particularly, I was interested … Continue reading Using Digital Archives to Teach Nineteenth-Century African American Writers

The #DHattheCC Project: Digital Humanities Needs Community Colleges

PALS Note: We are excited to have a guest post from Tawyna Ravy. Ravy is a PhD Candidate at George Washington University and an instructor at Northern Virginia Community College.  Ravy's post is written in response to a question posed at the end of our recap of MLA panels on teaching with archives and the digital humanities. We asked … Continue reading The #DHattheCC Project: Digital Humanities Needs Community Colleges