Academia, Your Whorephobia is Showing

Academics love a good dragging of higher education’s broken systems. Academics got exactly such a dragging when The Chronicle of Higher Education dropped a long-form feature essay on December 5th, 2019.  The essay detailed a first-person account written by a recent PhD graduate abandoned, shamed, and harassed by their dissertation advisor. The essay’s author found … Continue reading Academia, Your Whorephobia is Showing

Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Cookbooks Not Novels

I have kept a running list of things students have called novels: plays, essays, articles, both primary and secondary sources of all sorts, poems, textbooks, memoirs, and cookbooks. Given how often I teach cookbooks in the scope of the American Literary tradition I have perhaps encountered this term-swapping with “cookbooks” at a disproportionate rate. Before … Continue reading Cookbooks Not Novels

Try an “I”: Essayistic Narration for Journalists

I recently taught a short intensive course in creative writing—“Nonfiction Bootcamp.” My students traveled from Carleton University’s School of Journalism (Ottawa, Ontario) to spend five weeks in a Yukon-based experiential learning program, Stories North. The program addresses one of the most pressing issues in the Americas: that of Indigenous sovereignty. Stories North asks: how can … Continue reading Try an “I”: Essayistic Narration for Journalists

Comminglings of Law and Literature: Thoughts from the Yukon Territory

I am presently on a Fulbright in Whitehorse, Yukon (northwestern Canada) to write essays. Politics-wise, this year gives me a little window through which to watch Indigenous land claims unfold in the Yukon, and pedagogy-wise it gives me time to observe the special relationship that Yukon College (the future Yukon University) maintains with the territory’s … Continue reading Comminglings of Law and Literature: Thoughts from the Yukon Territory

Reading the Monster and its Moment

We kicked off our Halloween content last week with Elaina Frulla's post about teaching Invasion of the Body Snatchers. This week we are pleased to have a comprehensive text on teaching the idea of monsters from Adam Golub. Golub is professor and director of the M.A. program in American Studies at California State University, Fullerton … Continue reading Reading the Monster and its Moment

Teaching Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America after Charlottesville

PALS Note: We are excited to feature this guest post by Katie Fitzpatrick that continues earlier discussions of the role of the political in literature classrooms. Fitzpatrick explains the immediacy of engaging students in constructive political discourse as she considers how to find a balance between the content of a course titled "Democracy in America" … Continue reading Teaching Philip Roth’s The Plot Against America after Charlottesville

Welcome to Norway: The Beginnings of a Fulbright Year

Last year, your intrepid reporter, aka me, wrote about the pedagogical inspiration I found while traveling in San Francisco (here and here). This year I will make my pedagogical travel writing (a genre I just invented, I think) a little more permanent. I will be writing from Norway! I have received a Fulbright to be … Continue reading Welcome to Norway: The Beginnings of a Fulbright Year

What’s in a Composition?

PALS Note: We are delighted to have a guest post from Jacinta Yanders. Yanders is working her PhD in TV and Film Studies at The Ohio State University. Here Yanders explains how she incorporates student production of various digital media in her "Digital Media Composing" and "Documentary in the US Experience" writing courses. Cliché as … Continue reading What’s in a Composition?

Teaching Disney, Part Two: Race and Ethnicity, and Economics

PALS Note: This post is Part Two of guest poster's coverage of teaching Disney in the Children's Literature classroom. (Find Part One here.) In this section, Philip Smith discusses addressing race and economics when teaching Disney. These ideas help us think about teaching Disney in all of its complexity and getting students to critique texts … Continue reading Teaching Disney, Part Two: Race and Ethnicity, and Economics

Teaching Disney, Part One: Hypertextuality, The Formula, and Gender

PALS Note: We welcome a two-part post from Philip Smith, an Assistant Professor of English at the University of The Bahamas. Smith regularly teaches Children's Literature, and we are excited to have our first post on children's lit. This post and Part Two, which will follow, cover a myriad of possibilities for teaching one of … Continue reading Teaching Disney, Part One: Hypertextuality, The Formula, and Gender

Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature-Part Two: Contemporary Texts and Authors

In November, I blogged about teaching ancient oral literatures at the beginning of a semester-long survey course in American literature. Here’s the follow-up on coming full circle from oral tradition (in weeks one and two) to contemporary Native American literature (in weeks fourteen and fifteen). Bookending a survey course with studies of Native literature is … Continue reading Bookending the Survey Course with Native American Literature-Part Two: Contemporary Texts and Authors