Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Towards the end of the summer we put out a Twitter call for a crowdsourced list of online materials useful for teaching. We heard a wealth of responses from our followers. In the past, we would have turned all those tweets into a Twitter Moment. Alas the Twitter Moments feature is basically unusable. It has … Continue reading Crowdsourced Online Resources for Teaching

Teaching “To Kill a Mockingbird” as a Confederate Monument

Recent debates surrounding Confederate monuments, their relationship to the legacies of U.S. slavery and racism, and concerns about the “erasure of the history” crowd the headlines as colleges and universities, particularly in the American south, grapple with the presence of these monuments on today’s diverse campuses. Well before and certainly in the aftermath of the … Continue reading Teaching “To Kill a Mockingbird” as a Confederate Monument

Cookbooks Not Novels

I have kept a running list of things students have called novels: plays, essays, articles, both primary and secondary sources of all sorts, poems, textbooks, memoirs, and cookbooks. Given how often I teach cookbooks in the scope of the American Literary tradition I have perhaps encountered this term-swapping with “cookbooks” at a disproportionate rate. Before … Continue reading Cookbooks Not Novels

Fostering Complexity in the Age of Oversimplification: Teaching American Culture in 90 Minutes or Less, Part One

We are pleased to have a guest post this week from Theresa Dietrich. Dietrich is currently a Fulbright English Teaching Assistant in Norway and writes about her experience planning lessons for classes she will only meet once. How do you teach students about a topic in one class period? Dietrich shares two examples below and … Continue reading Fostering Complexity in the Age of Oversimplification: Teaching American Culture in 90 Minutes or Less, Part One

From CRLA 2017: Synthesizing Primary Texts, Secondary Texts, and Protest Songs

From November 1 through November 4, I attended the College Reading and Learning Association’s 50th National Conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. As stated on their website, the College Reading and Learning Association (CRLA) consists of “a group of student-oriented professionals active in the fields of reading, learning assistance, developmental education, tutoring, and mentoring at the college/adult … Continue reading From CRLA 2017: Synthesizing Primary Texts, Secondary Texts, and Protest Songs